Writing in Shorts- Terry Ambrose

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I hope everyone had a good holiday weekend. Is there any pumpkin pie left? My favorite Thanksgiving leftover is turkey. I love a simple turkey sandwich the day after and the day after that, too. Here I am talking about food, again. Good thing this series of interviews is with the authors of Cooking up Crime!

This is the fifth of fourteen interviews to celebrate Happy Homicides 6: Cooking Up Crime

My guest today is Terry Ambrose. His story in the anthology is titled Recipe for Murder and is part of his Seaside Cove Bed & Breakfast Mystery series. Terry has written more than a dozen books, several of which have been award finalists. In 2014, his thriller, “Con Game,” won the San Diego Book Awards for Best Action-Thriller. In a former life, he ran skip traces and collected on deadbeats. That gave him great material for his stories and also taught him “liars come from all walks of life”. He is always watching out for scams. If you follow his blog & social media (links at the end of the interview) you will benefit from his vigilance.

a-treasure-to-die-for-web Terry Ambrose 400x560 License-to-Lie

When and why did you begin writing “in shorts”? Is it harder or easier than full-length novels?

For years I only wrote full-length novels. I loved the complexity of piecing together a complex plot, building characters, and finding ways to weave it all together. My first short endeavor was a story written for an anthology I organized to benefit Read Aloud America, an organization that promotes literacy in Hawai’i. I found the process of writing shorter to be equally challenging and have enjoyed writing “in shorts” ever since.

What is your favorite short story anthology beside the Happy Homicide series?

I’d have to say “Paradise, Passion, Murder: 10 Tales of Mystery from Hawai’i.” Okay, I’m prejudiced because I organized it, but also I loved the stories about Hawai’i from the other authors.

As an author, what has been your most embarrassing moment, typo, or gaffe?

Leaving out the typos that create words of the unmentionable variety, I’d have to say it occurred while I was talking to an local editor in Carlsbad, CA. The book in which the gaffe occurred is License to Lie and is set in Carlsbad. An interstate freeway runs north-south through Carlsbad. In one of the closing scenes, my protagonists were on their way to meet the antagonist at an outlet mall, which is a very public place. They drove south, took the freeway exit, and drove over the freeway to the mall.

At a professional meeting for writers and publishers, a local editor came up to me and told me he liked the book, but said there was one problem with that scene. The road to the mall doesn’t go over the freeway, it goes under. Ugh.

What is your favorite vacation spot to be in shorts? (I want you to say Miami, but no pressure. wink)

Sorry, but not Miami—Kaua’i. I love the climate, the smaller atmosphere, and it’s the one place where I feel truly centered. Okay, maybe that’s a little too touchy-feely for some people.

Since this edition of Happy Homicides is food themed, I have to ask—What is your favorite comfort food?

Hmmm…tough choice. If we’re going with cookies as comfort food, then probably Chocolate Chip Coconut Macaroons. If we’re talking about something halfway nutritious, then it would be chicken pot pie—but it has to be gluten-free since I’m one of those people with Celiac disease and am gluten intolerant. And yes, we do have a killer chicken pot pie recipe. Yay!

Yum! My family eats a lot of gluten free foods due to gluten intolerance. I will be trying out the GF recipes Terry has on his website. Enough to fill a cookbook. Hey, there’s an idea Terry. Maybe that will be your next publishing adventure?

Follow Terry Ambrose on these social media platforms.

 facebook 

goodreads 

instagram 

pinterest

twitter 

Happy Homicides 6: Cooking Up Crime has a bonus pdf of recipes & crafts. Instructions on how to access the bonus file are in the book. FYI-If you are an amazon prime member the book is free! Leave a review once you’ve read a few of the stories in the anthology. It helps other readers discover us.